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20130801
20130831
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CSPAN 41
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English 41
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CSPAN
Aug 19, 2013 10:00am EDT
big shoes to follow. the party respects women across america. that is why it gives me great pleasure to reward one of the greatest females with the beacon award. it was created to give an award to an outstanding democrat who exemplifies the ideals and values. in 2009, it was awarded to jimmy carter. it went to state senator and the majority leader. last year's award went to tom harkin. this year's award has gone to secretary hillary clinton. [applause] i have with me on stage some north iowa democratic women with me hereto except the award on senator clinton -- secretary clinton's behalf. on january 21, 2009, hillary rodham clinton was sworn in as secretary of the united states. secretary clinton joined the state department after nearly four decades as an advocate, attorney, first lady, and senator. she attended local public schools before graduating from wellesley college, where she met bill clinton. she married bill clinton and became a successful attorney while also raising chelsea. she was an assistant professor at the university of arkansas law school, and she was appointed by j
CSPAN
Aug 25, 2013 12:00am EDT
. the new militancy of 1963 changed america and inspired the world. but the promise -- the promise of democracy has not been made real for all of us. the promise is not real for people who work hard and play by the rules every single day, struggling to pay their bills. the promise is not real for retirees who work hard all their lives but don't know how they will make it day to day. the promise is not real for students who graduate under so much debt they wonder if they will ever climb out of it. and the promise is not real for all of us if it is not real for all of us it is not real for any of us. so we are here to replenish our spirit, restore our faith, and renew our activism. today we march for a nation where workers have decent pay, good benefits and rights on a job that no one can steal. today we march for a nation where the golden years of retirement are spent in peace, not in poverty. today we march for a nation where our children, no matter what they look like, where they live, or what they wear, can walk our streets in freedom and not in fear. today we march for a nation
CSPAN
Aug 11, 2013 6:00am EDT
joining forces, we are so proud of the work you've done to help rally america around military families and veterans. i'm inspired by what they're doing, so thank you, michelle, for your extraordinary work. join at was proud to your convention three years ago. [applause] it is wonderful to be back. i want to thank your national much.der, thank you so teame entire leadership johnson, burgess, don adams, all the incredible spouses and spouses that the dav auxiliary. i want to thank barry janowski. i got it. [laughter] they used to mispronounce obama, too. [laughter] i want to thank barry and your grade team in washington. disabled american veterans, like all veterans, you carry in your hearts the story of brave service that took you to every as young men earth , leftmen, you left home everyone you ever knew because clouds gathered far across the sea. you had your whole life ahead of you, but you were willing to risk all of it for this land that we love. because you know from hard experience what we must never our country and doors because in every generation there are americans like you w
CSPAN
Aug 17, 2013 7:00pm EDT
of america through the senses. the population reached 17 million in 26 states. we consistently see 30%. slaves #2.5 million, which is almost 15% of the population, and new orleans joins the list of the largest cities in the united states. we heard about the tylers and their attitude toward slavery. give us an indication of what was happening in 1840. >> this is a tremendous time of sexual tension. we like to think the country is divided regionally, that everyone in the north is anti slavery and everyone in the south is proslavery. it is not that simple. people in the north benefited from slavery and the slave trade until it was ended. they now move into a different economic arena. they no longer need slavery, and slippery as a threat to them because of the free labor system in the north, and the kinds of the economy that is needed to preserve institutions in the north are different from those in the south, so what is happening in congress is both groups want to control legislation, because if you are in more industrialized regions, we want certain parts of laws passed to preserve the
CSPAN
Aug 29, 2013 5:00pm EDT
america and against our interests. the president is committed to strengthening these programs. he has put forth ideas to strengthen these organs. he is following through on promises of reforms. i terms of specific reports, am not in a position to comment on it because i have not read it. >> is the white house aware of out?toruy coming were you guys aware, and i'm curious if you have concerns about this kind of information being out, or are you comfortable -- >> it is hard for me to a comment on the information in the report. i did not talk to the journalist or can on the story, so i'm not a position to comment on that information. we have talked about our concerns about the damaging leak of classified information, but i am not sure whether or not that applies here because i have not read the story. times talked a couple about the global community being in agreement now on chemical weapons in syria. consensus will strengthen over the next few days, or is it already at a point where the president feels he has international mandate? new -- we consider will continue our consultations with i l
CSPAN
Aug 2, 2013 2:00pm EDT
, and dealing with assistance to those in america, the richest country on the face of the earth, who are going hungry, a large number of whom are children who live in america. the committee on agriculture passed out a bipartisan bill in the last congress and it was never brought before my republican friends. this year the committee also passed out a bipartisan bill that was brought to this floor. it could have and should have been passed with a bipartisan vote. not because i agreed with all of it, but because it was appropriate to have a bill to go to conference with on this important subject. our republican friends added three amendments which we harmful to clearly those in need in america. as a result, we didn't vote for it, but that's not why it failed, mr. speaker. it failed because 62 republicans voted against the bill reported out with every republican voting in committee for it. one was mr. lucas, the chairman of the committee observed, it apparently wasn't good enough for those 62 republicans. compromise seems very difficult for some people in this house. but i again remind us all it
CSPAN
Aug 13, 2013 12:00am EDT
, but john tyler's views were consistent. letitia was different. >> here is 1840 view of america through the senses. the population reached 17 million in 26 states. we consistently see 30%. slaves #2.5 million, which is almost 15% of the population, and new orleans joins the list of the largest cities in the united states. we heard about the tylers and their attitude toward slavery. give us an indication of what was happening in 1840. >> this is a tremendous time of sexual tension. we like to think the country is divided regionally, that everyone in the north is anti slavery and everyone in the south is proslavery. it is not that simple. people in the north benefited from slavery and the slave trade until it was ended. they now move into a different economic arena. they no longer need slavery, and slippery as a threat to them because of the free labor system in the north, and the kinds of the economy that is needed to preserve institutions in the north are different from in the north are different from those in the south, so what is happening in congress is both groups want to control le
CSPAN
Aug 31, 2013 7:00pm EDT
, they are trying to place in america in the important role of history. this is where they would have dinner. they would have a chance to meet one another, conversed socially and casually, and then they might be invited to dine in the dining room. after supper, the ladies would then adjourn back into the drawing room. maybe they would serve some coffee and tea. this was the social center of the house. if you were an invited guest of the madisons or part of the intimate circle of family or friends, you would be invited into the dining room from the drawing room. and here, dolly madison would in an unusual setting for the timeframe set at the head of the table and her husband, james, would sit at the center of the table. dolly would direct in, it -- with direct the conversation and james would be able to engage in intimate conversation with the people immediately to his right and left. this table today is that for eight people, but there could be as many as 20 people served in the dining room. that would not be unusual. and indeed, dolly madison considered dining at maag pier to be so much mor
CSPAN
Aug 22, 2013 10:00am EDT
standards that are in little of informational texts. america is seeing two paths. choice or centralized education by the common core national standards. we have a choice to make. are we going to be a self- governing society or are a -- or society governed by despotism. a portion of one of the many education related events during c-span cost -- c-span's town hall program. we invite you to join the conversation. it starts tonight, 7:30 p.m. eastern time >> tonight on "first ladies." sofrances cleveland is popular. people are imitating her hairstyle. of her for piece themselves. we have always hurt as if we if we owned the first lady peered pictures of the first lady lady became extremely popular. you could purchase your own picture to have in your home. she is used in campaigns. we also have ms. cleveland running for first lady. >> the encore presentation of "first ladies" continues tonight at 9:00 eastern leading up to our live event at 11:00 this morning with the help secretary, we will hear about health care from vic morris, the former linton white house adviser. he speaks for about 25
CSPAN
Aug 12, 2013 10:00am EDT
, the weekly standard, and the group concerned veterans for america. coming. you all for i am normally not intimidated at these events, but now that i realized who is here, now i am very worried. have all of you. i also want to thank you for your service, how pleased i am that peter king and john stossel have agreed to be here, judy miller and john bernstein as well. in afghanistan, i was visiting with a couple of people in 2011. to trainvolunteered the afghan army. i remember him telling me at the time one of the key principles was to keep it simple. that is a key military principle. pete organized this event in the opposite way. two speakers, four panelists, john and i are co-moderators. luckily, the quality of the people overwhelm the complexity. we will have peter king speak for 10 minutes, john stossel speak for 10 minutes, and then we will have a panel. judy and gary will kick off, and a discussionhave it ihave of security. these are people who have thought seriously about this. i will give a brief introduction of pete king and john stossel and then get off the stage. peter king
CSPAN
Aug 26, 2013 9:00pm EDT
that attracted the president to want to go? >> it was a world there. -- fair, it was a celebration of america's place in the new world. the presidency was very surprising in many ways. in fact, he was the president who took the country to the world stage. the spanish-american war and turned america into a republican into an empire. at the end of his life in the last speech he gave, in effect he talks in ways that years later we can all appreciate about opening america to the world. >> we were looking at our posting and everybody is asking about what is known of ida mckinley, her ill health. here she is traveling with the president. what did the country think of the president to know about her? >> it is an interesting dichotomy. this is the pattern of her life. she had been grossly miscast by history as this victorian invalid on the fainting couch. there were times when she was that way. she had chronic illnesses. one was seizure disorder, known as epilepsy. she had damage along her left leg which led to immobility. she also had a compromised immune system. she was susceptible to infections. t
CSPAN
Aug 28, 2013 12:00am EDT
. it is a struggle of a lifetime. to redeem the soul of america. we still need to find a way to humanize our political institution, our businesses, and our system of education. 50 years later, those of us educated to the full -- calls of justice, need to appease ourselves. our struggle is an ongoing struggle. there will be progress. there will also be setbacks. we must continue to have hope and be still in our faith that this nation will become a truly multiracial democracy. we must continue to work. we must not give up or give in. keep the faith. and people hurting and suffering, we must be ready to take action, cast our votes, and move our feet. we must have a sense of urgency to use the power rented us to help end human suffering. we as a people and a congress understand our differences do not divide us. we will be at our best when we accept that we are one people, one american family, that we all live in the same house. the american house, the world house. understand that no one, but no one, is breathless. everyone can make a contribution. the march on washington is saying to us today th
CSPAN
Aug 23, 2013 10:00am EDT
between race and the criminal justice system. lawyer part of the moving america towards justice series. march onlso a special washington event. to haverivileged today a dynamic group of individuals who will guide our coverage around the complicated tough relationship between race and the criminal justice system. a briefrovide introduction for each panelist. they will then be allowed a short amount of time to present their area of expertise and focus and then we will open the floor after i have a series of brief questions to the panel. we will open the floor for your questions. i hope that you have gotten the cards and written your questions down. you will be holding them up so our people can collect them and bring them to me to read. before we get to the panel, it is a pleasure for me to introduce the president of the national bar association, patricia rosier. -- i just can't have her come up. she is the president of the national bar association, the nation's largest association of african american lawyers in justice. portionedicated a major of her life's work to the bar association. s
CSPAN
Aug 27, 2013 5:00pm EDT
a political perspective, america does not want to touch the kind of mess in the middle east. theink that is just political context and reality of this. you asked whether any of us have regrets. regarding our support for democracy in the muslim brotherhood. let me be very clear. i know you know this. the three people sitting up here today have each been very clear eyed and very critical of what we saw as actions by the muslim brotherhood and president morsi that were undermining democratic prospects in egypt. president morsi issued a decree that set him above judicial review. he ran through a constitution that was asked visionary -- was exclusionary. were pushing ay law that would have eviscerated the judiciary. it would have clamped down public protests. civilld have nationalized society organizations in the country. i don't think any of us had any illusions about the trajectory that he was on and we all voice to those concerns. think, to no way i say that i am easily relaxed about the outcome in egypt. i think what happened on july 3 has sent a country further down the path toward
CSPAN
Aug 25, 2013 12:40pm EDT
crisis, what is the state of the banking system now? what can be done to pull america out of this tepid period of growth? we are joined by incredible experts on the panel. mohammed el-erian, ceo of pacific investment management company. sheila bair, senior adviser to charitable trusts. john taylor, professor of economics at stanford university and senior fellow at the hoover institution. he is well-known for the taylor rule, a monetary policy principle that offers guidance on how to tinker with interest rates to control inflation. taylor served as undersecretary of the treasury during the george w. bush administration and was part of the council of economic advisers. specimen so much for being here today. special thanks to mohammed el- erian and mr. taylor for flying from california. i want to kick off the panel with you. you coined the term, the new normal in 2009. your outlook for the economy has been dead on. how much longer is this economy going to remain in the new normal? >> let me take you back to 2009 when the new normal concept came out. the idea was to signal that it would not
CSPAN
Aug 15, 2013 7:00am EDT
there are 40 million muslims in america? these images that's we see of burning vehicles, they will be everyday. host: ok, to a for the call. this is from marie -- obama got us into this debacle in egypt prompting me muslim brotherhood. there is this headline, the journalists among the dead in egypt, including the husband and a former "post" reporter who was killed. more details on mick deane, who was killed in cairo. a statement from the british prime minister david cameron who paid tribute to the reporter on twitter -- i am sad to hear the death of cameraman mick deane. my thoughts are with his family and a sky news team. my next call is rich from fairfax, virginia. republican, good morning. caller: thank you for taking my call. i was disgusted last night was watching the news, and i saw a caterpillar bulldozer into their where thesehe area people were. that equipment i'm sure was bought with money the united states gave the egyptian army. i just think of how that equipment is used in this country, to build things, and we are over there destroying stuff. it just makes me sick. we need to stop
CSPAN
Aug 11, 2013 7:00am EDT
or bad. yes, the long-term concern is there. if the papers go away america will be in very serious trouble because when you get down to it the television reporters are , what that one guy said, they are lap poodles. it is basically nothing more than lap pools for house members here in phoenix. you just do not know what is going on in washington from the electronic media at all. for the callou this morning. on that subject that you talked about on the future of newspapers and specifically what might happen with "the washington post," and this bezos -- by jeff might've contributed to part the sale. here's a bit of what he said. [video clip] was latemily was in -- in adopting a payroll product, which most of the major market has already started doing. the fact that they could've started that years ago, the way the financial times or the wall street journal had done years ago, i think maybe that certainly hastens their financial difficulties, that they were so late to doing a pay wall. politico is a block in bc. they have a high tier subscription product, which seems to be doing very w
CSPAN
Aug 13, 2013 5:00pm EDT
creating competitive industry. >> but since 2000 there's only new carrier in our country virgin america. we have on the others one in minnesota but there new carrier viable since 2000. and don't you think there are to entry that make it hard for new airlines to competitive? over thenk if you look last many years there have been industry.ts into the jetblue is a great example of a -- that sprang grown last decade and has nationwide. so, i think there are ample opportunities and capital vailable for new airlines to enter the market. >> i note that jetblue is only we have nowrket and these three major carriers. do you want to respond? first off, again noting how complementary our two networks by putting them together we create a third competitor -- fourth competitor to what are three airlines larger ta and s, united, dell southwest and allows more competition, not less. 12 laps overlatch being out put00 -- overlapping we can more efficient service to consumers. also note that in the $1 billion synergies that i noted there s not one assumed fare increase. he synergies are not built on assum
CSPAN
Aug 16, 2013 10:00am EDT
of america merrill lynch. we will grow by 8.2% this year, beating china for the fifth straight year. the energy front, our oil production has increased by 50% since 2005. iraq a expects to increase oil production to 4.5 million barrels by the end of 2014 and 9 million barrels a day by 2020. as the international energy agency has reported, iraq is poised to double our export of oil by the decade of 2015. -- of 2050. we will use our strained global oil markets. in spite of this progress, we have challenges that we are working to address. 90% of our economy depends on oil. unemployment rate is 11%, our poverty line rate is 23%. although there has been significant progress over the last few years, and we think the development millennium goals set by the united nations. in order to diversify our economy beyond energy, iraq is investing oil revenues in education and crucial development projects, including restoration of power and rebuilding our transportation system. our economy will benefit from our progress on the germanic front as well. last month, the united nations security council r
CSPAN
Aug 22, 2013 1:00am EDT
system now? what can be done to pull america out of this tepid period of growth? we are joined by incredible experts on the panel. mohammed el-erian, ceo of pacific investment management company. sheila bair, senior adviser to charitable trusts. john taylor, professor of economics at stanford university and senior fellow at the hoover institution. he is well-known for the taylor rule, a monetary policy principle that offers guidance on how to tinker with interest rates to control inflation. taylor served as undersecretary of the treasury during the george w. bush administration and was part of the council of economic advisers. specimen so much for being here today. -- thank you so much for being here today. special thanks to mohammed el- erian and mr. taylor for flying from california. i want to kick off the panel with you. you coined the term, the new normal in 2009. your outlook for the economy has been dead on. how much longer is this economy going to remain in the new normal? >> let me take you back to 2009 when the new normal concept came out. the idea was to signal that i
CSPAN
Aug 22, 2013 6:00am EDT
, but what is the risk of the social fabric of america beginning to fray? >> it is fraying. it is fraying because we started out with social inequality and now it is getting worse. it is getting worse because of the policies we are pursuing to try and restart our economy. if the fed is the only policy making entity in play today in washington, not by choice but by necessity, the fed can only act using indirect policies. it cannot invest in infrastructure. it cannot change the tax code. it has to convince people to do things. how does it convince people? the idea is very simple. you make asset markets unofficially high. the wealth effect, people feel richer. maybe companies will invest more who owns financial assets? you have this irony in using imperfect policy by necessity, you make income inequality worse. >> ms. bair, do you believe that this is contributing to the widening of income inequality? >> i do. it is not trickle down. it has resulted in financial asset inflation. that benefits people who own financial assets who are the wealthier folks. there are not quality jobs. the vast ma
CSPAN
Aug 27, 2013 7:00am EDT
parties and a funeral, plus plenty of valet parking in america's gilded capitol. read the book and engage on our facebook page and twitter. "washington journal" continues. host: at the table now, michael steele, the former r.n.c. chairman from 200-2011, thank you for joining us. we've been talking about syria, do you see a division within the republican party on syria? guest: i don't think there's been a clear voice that's come out about what republicans say about this. certainly there is a union anymority about what we need to do next, which is definitely deal with the use of chemical weapons by the assad government. but i think a lot of republicans are waiting to see exactly where the president is going to go with the foreign policy. you have the secretary of state calling this a moral obscenity. so the tone and the rhetoric is there. the question is now what are the next steps? the president and his team have been very good, at least in this instance, of getting and keeping the congress informed, getting members of congress in on the conversation early enough, so that should some type
CSPAN
Aug 10, 2013 7:00pm EDT
. they would say, the united states of america are. which signaled that it was not quite holding together. there was a fear it was holding -- going to fall apart. they called it regionalism, and later they call is sectionalism as they head to the civil war. so we know that nation is going to be a strong nation state, it is a democracy, and a two-party system and a strong president. that was none of the things the founders had intended. we look back and see that time as a time of growing pains. and we see dolley madison not knowing how this would end, was the perfect person to ease into the country and twa it was going to be. >> serving as the chief executive of the nation, he brought the real concept of how he wanted the role to be carried out. how did he approach it and how did she help him? >> well, you said "concept," and i think that's perfect, because he was the idea guy. he was very theoretical. he and other members of the founding generation understood as a concept "unit." it was their number one job. how do you do it? how do you bring forth unity? what dolley madison did is take t
CSPAN
Aug 9, 2013 8:00pm EDT
and our values. and to others around the world, i want to make clear once again that america is not interested in spying on ordinary people. our intelligence is focused above all on finding the information necessary to protect our people and, in many cases, detect our allies. it's true -- protect our allies. it's true, we have surveillance capability, but it is also true that we have shown a restraint that many governments around the world won't even think of doing or refuse to show. that includes, by the way, some of america's most of her -- most we should not. forget stricter guidelines. some other governments will throw their citizens in prison for what they say online. let me close with one additional thought. the men and women of our intelligence community work every single day to keep us safe because they love this country and believe in our values. they are patriots. and i believe that those who have lawfully raised their voices on the -- on behalf of privacy and civil liberties are also patriots who love our country and want to live up to our highest ideals. so this i
CSPAN
Aug 20, 2013 10:00am EDT
-market system in the united states of america. [applause] i am working every day to try to help carry that free-market message and try to help when the argument. how many of you have phones on you? take out your phones and text the word growth to 33733. text "growth" to 33733. we are working to try to build a conservative army across this country that will stand up and fight to bring us back to our free-market principles, bring us back to our constitutional liberties, and the only way we can do it is to bring together millions of conservatives across the country. freedom is not some abstract academic concept. it is something we know in our own lives. in my life, my dad was born in cuba. he was imprisoned and tortured, almost beaten to death. he fled in 1957, fleeing the batista regime. he was 18 and could not speak a word of english. nothing but $100 in his underwear. i don't advise carrying money in your underwear. he washed dishes to pay his way to the university of texas. he went on to start a small business, to work words the american dream. my dad used to say to me over and over again, and
CSPAN
Aug 13, 2013 10:00am EDT
and how we can bring our a game to the table every day to serve america's communities that have many times too little access to health care. so i wanted to welcome you all to the room and welcome senator ben cardin to the room who is no stranger to baltimore medical since and has been around i got here, and that is like 300 years ago. senator was at the very beginning of a great assist to baltimore medical system when we had our help waiver. we had a medicare demonstration project for many years, and every time it looked like it was going to end or expire come -- the senator could be counted on to not only sure it will be realistic but to renew the effort to make sure that happened. when we wanted to build a brand- new building, he was the first one i came to see. which started the conversation when he was on one side of the hill and ended the conversation on the other side of the hill because it took that long for us to get the job done but the senator was responsible for the first public money coming into this venture that eventually grew into the building you were all sitting in now. fo
CSPAN
Aug 20, 2013 12:00am EDT
the world attended it. it was really a time for america to shine and to show that it was coming into its own as a world power. guest: mrs. grant loved it. she bought two things for the white house from there -- one was a shield that showed characters from milton's "paradise lost." then she bought a more endearing piece -- she hated the old james monroe centerpiece with mirrors on it -- she bought a hiawatha centerpiece, which was about this big, and it shows a canoe in the middle and hiawatha lounging on a bearskin rug. that was the new centerpiece for the white house. she bought it there on exhibit. it is still in the silver closet at the white house. host: on twitter -- who were the first lady's staff at this point in the process? guest: there was no social secretary then. usually the ladies got together and filled out the blanks for invitations. it was president and mrs. grant and the honorable blank and blank. their friends would come over for tea party and they would fill out the blanks. she had mary mueller as the housekeeper. is that the one who traveled to europe with her? guest: i
CSPAN
Aug 21, 2013 10:00am EDT
intervention. it believes the rebels will not support america's interest if they were to come to power now. this came out to a letter that general dempsey sent. he said the military is clearly taking out the syrian air force and shifting the balance. michigan republican congressman justin amash held a town hall meeting recently in michigan. he touched on topics like health care and government surveillance. he offered an amendment that would bar the and as a from collecting phone and data records from citizens who are not subject of investigation. the amendment was opposed by speaker john boehner and the white house and ultimately defeated. his town hall back in michigan lasted about one hour and 15 minutes. [applause] >> hello, everyone. ben, he is my chief of staff. he does not just work for me. he is primarily in our grand rapids office, and you can find that on my website, and we have a satellite office in battle creek, so if there is something you would like to schedule, you can contact our grand rapids office, and we will make sure we will have someone to meet with you as well. jordan
CSPAN
Aug 23, 2013 8:00pm EDT
, to restore that shining city on a hill that is the united states of america. thank you and god bless you. [applause] >> thank you so much. first of all, i want to say i learned something new tonight. here in new hampshire, we say thank you all. in texas, they think all you all. is that more thank you or more people? >> technically speaking, all y'a ll is the plural of y'all. that was ronald reagan reminded us that freedom is only one generation away from extension. if we do not engage now in the freedom, we will want -- we will one day be telling our children what it is like to be free. i need to repair and oversight. we have another candidate. i know there is nobody here who wants to see custer win another term in the united states house. we know we have a potential candidate and former senator gary lambert. he is with us tonight. i hope you get a chance to say hello to him as well. now, our host, i do so much. >> hey, did we have a speaker tonight. joseph and i -- you turn down the heat to much. we would like to ask -- invite you all to have some coffee in the back. there is wonderful
CSPAN
Aug 6, 2013 10:30pm EDT
at the time and what it was like to be america's first lady and not just the wife of an american mr. an american minister, but to be a wife and a daughter. >> the thing that i always think about with abigail is the relationship, the partnership. without abigail, there is no john. without john, there is no abigail.>> john is important to history. >> yes. with the support she provided to him in europe, in the presidency, in the vice presidency, she was so trustworthy that she could to -- take care of things. so he could go off and be this great public person, which was exactly what she wanted.>> to our guests, our thanks for helping us understand more about the life and legacy of america's second first lady abigail adams. thank you for your time. >> thank you. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> wednesday night, we continue our encore of the first season ladies," with dolly madison. , september 9, a look at the life of edith roosevelt. our website has a special section on the first ladies, including "welco
CSPAN
Aug 7, 2013 1:00am EDT
by french revolutionaries and the a were influencing people in america. there were rumors that cities would be burned. it was terrorism they were anticipating. for example, the opposition party, the democratic republican party was very enthusiastic about the french and some of the ideals of the french revolution. >> jefferson in particular. >> this is where they begin to go in different directions. also, some of the press is very vehement in their criticism of the administration. so they muzzled the press and said that this is probably the thing that john adams is most criticized for. abigail, i believe, supported john. abigail was even more vehement during i think she is even more conservative than john during that time. >> the upshot of this, the people who were breaking the alien and sedition acts -- >> you could be jailed. >> it was said that the press made things up. he had no standards. it was not the they were supporting the french, but they were making up stories that were not the truth europe adams was very seriously worried about this. jefferson -- that were not the truth. adams w
CSPAN
Aug 16, 2013 8:00pm EDT
respects and admires women throughout america. that is why it gives me great pleasure tonight to honor one of the greatest american female politicians with the beacon award. the beacon award was begun in 2008 and it was created to give an award to an outstanding nationallyatewide or who exemplifies the best of the democratic party ideals and values. 2008, it was awarded to senator edward kennedy. in 2009, it was awarded to jimmy and berkeley. to u.s. senator john culver. to senatet went majority leader mike. last year's award went to tom harkin. i am pleased to announce that this year's beacon award has been awarded to secretary hillary clinton. [applause] i have with me on stage, before i give a little about senator and secretary of state hillary clinton's bio, i have some women with me who are here to accept the award on secretary clinton's the half. with that, a little bit of bio information about secretary clinton and then we will have joy who will represent our group of north iowa democratic women to accept the award. on january 21, 2009, hillary clinton was sworn in as the 67th secre
CSPAN
Aug 18, 2013 3:15pm EDT
of tightening budgets. on c-span two. the new america foundation examines electronic surveillance and human rights with access now. that is live at 6:00 p.m. here on c-span. next, a discussion about the role of public government affairs officers -- offices. posted by the national press tee, this is commit an hour and a half. >> welcome to the national press club, and this evening's discussion of whether or not federal public affairs offices have become a hindrance more than a help to press freedom and open government. or if you like, our shorter title. my name is john donnelly. i'm a reporter with congressional quarterly and roll call. i'm chairman of the national press club's press freedom committee, sponsoring tonight's event along with the young members committee. you can find out more about the national press club and membership therein at press.org. is being event broadcast, webcast on that site. it will be archived there later. it is also being broadcast on c- span two right now. if you are following us on twitter, the handler is @pressclubtv and #opengovernment. note, theprogramming
CSPAN
Aug 6, 2013 9:00pm EDT
of the things we should take away from those statistics, that snapshot of america? >> one of the things is there is an expansion going on. this is one of the things that is very difficult for the adamses because politics are changing, and the changing politics means they are new englanders. they are federalists. as time goes by, as the population moved south and westward, it makes it more difficult for politics that they believe in. >> we are going to invite your telephone calls. we will be going to calls in just a few minutes. i am told you want to read us a passage from one of the letters. >> i would like to remark on the 39-year life span. that is not exactly accurate to the extent that children died much more rapidly. if a child survived to 12, probably the life span was much longer. many, many people lived into their 70's, as the adamses did. >> the five children -- how many of them survived to adulthood? >> four. >> four? you are getting a passage ready for us. you wanted to read us from the letter we talked about earlier, "remember the ladies"? >> right. in this particular letter
CSPAN
Aug 12, 2013 2:00pm EDT
when many of us deployed to central america on humanitarian missions -- all of the skill sets paid us benefits in the 90s and 2000. how do we want to have that dynamic training that will keep people in the guard? we are really pushing this hard right now. we have to have the opportunity to fill vacancies. whether it is a critical chart or a chart fall for two or three years. some of you remember the keep up program, where folks can get away from an employer. the family situation is right. they can go close to an active duty bill, especially to the joint world. to focushat we ought on. it starts with getting the active component, the reserve component, structured right for the future. -- he is heading to the marine forces commander reserve. commanding general of our larger organization. first marine general to command nato forces, general mills. >> as a new one on the panel i will say that i came to work with the reserve component with the greatest respect the cousin twice on the battlefield both in iraq and at -- in iraq and afghanistan. one of the biggest challenges is maintaining th
CSPAN
Aug 21, 2013 7:00pm EDT
the best shot they have. i am going to keep this the safest large city in america, and i am going to do it while ending unconstitutional stop and frisk. i am going to use the power of our neighborhoods for economic development to bring good jobs in every neighborhood, particularly those neighborhoods that have been left behind. i am going to take head on the affordability crisis. people cannot find homes and apartments they can't afford, so i am going to make sure we build more affordable housing, improve the housing authority, and get new york city over its own rent law. we are the greatest city of the world, and we can be even greater when we create more opportunity for folks to move into the middle class. that is what i have done my entire career, delivered for new york, and that is what i am going to do for mayor, and i ask for your vote tonight. thank you. applause]d >> mr. liu. >> i am an unlikely candidate for mayor, getting my degree in physics, spending most of my adult career outside of governmental politics, but i entered politics because i wanted to see a change creates i wa
CSPAN
Aug 17, 2013 3:00am EDT
them more resources. whether time he got down to hometown america, that was being bounced a bit. we held those others to a higher standard. the one third that was in the bottom all the time, usually it was our divisional units, you created a mindset that that is all they expect of us, that is where we are going to stay, and then we have 180 days to get ready to go. one of the best things the army did was adopt the rotation of the oxygen model. it has done so much for every functional area within the guard. not just with on that forces but all the enablers. everyone is in the cycle. i love that model. everybody does need a break. my option is we continue in that cycle. find out what the right amount is for the different functions. >> i think there is absolutely more room for operational forces and then more strategic forces in the navy reserve. we see that was seabees involved in rotation, squadrons who are operational, and yet there needs to be room in the reserve for people who can only do 38 days per year. people who can do the 12 months, 12 weekends, and 14 days. that is basicall
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